Muscles of the Medial Thigh




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Muscles of the Medial Thigh

 

Download these charts, posters and images of Muscles of the Medial Thigh and more for anatomy class. See below.  *Adductors*

 

The muscles of the medial thigh include:

Helpful hints:

adductor – (adduct = bring toward midline)

magnus – (magnus = large)

longus – (longus = long)

pectineus – (pecten = comb)

gracilis – (gracilis = thin)

(Additional adductor information at the end of this page)

Origin:

The medial thigh muscles all originate from the lower portion of the pelvic girdle.

Adductor magnus – This muscle originates at the inferior rami of the pubis and the ischium, as well as the ischial tuberosity.

Adductor longus – This muscle originates near the pubic symphysis.

Adductor brevis – This muscle originates at the inferior pubic ramus.

Pectineus – This muscle originates at the pectineal line of the pubis.

Gracilis – This muscle shares the same origin as the adductor longus, being the pubic symphysis.

Insertion:

The insertion of these muscles primarily include various locations on the medial shaft of the femur.

Adductor magnus – This muscle inserts onto the entire length of the linea aspera, including the adductor tubercle of the femur.

Adductor longus – This muscle inserts onto the middle 1/3 portion of the linea aspera.

Adductor brevis – This muscle inserts onto the proximal 1/3 portion of the linea aspera.

Pectineus – This muscle inserts onto the lesser trochanter and the pectineal line of the femur.

Gracilis – This muscle inserts onto the proximal medial portion of the tibial shaft.

Action:

Adductor magnus – The primary action of this muscle is hip joint adduction. Actions also include hip extension, flexion, lateral and medial rotation.

It is interesting to note that the Adductor magnus can be separately involved in two antagonistic muscle actions. This is possible due to a broad insertion and composite nature of this muscle.

Adductor longus – The action of this muscle includes hip adduction, flexion and medial rotation.

Adductor brevis –The action of this muscle includes hip adduction, flexion and medial rotation.

Some texts will note that the adductor brevis and adductor longus act in causing hip joint lateral rotation.

Pectineus – The action of this muscle includes hip flexion and adduction.

Some texts will also include the action of hip medial rotation.

Gracilis – The action of this muscle includes hip adduction. Since this muscle spans the hip joint and knee joint, there is also an action at the knee (biarticulate). The action at the knee joint includes knee flexion and medial rotation.

Additional Information:

The terms magnus, longus, and brevis relate to the anatomical size, the origin, and insertion of the individual muscles within the adductor muscle group. The adductor magnus is the largest muscle of adductor group as well as the largest of the medial thigh.

The adductor longus and brevis share a similar origin and insertion. The term ‘longus’ indicates that a particular muscle within a group has a more proximal origin and a more distal insertion than a ‘brevis’ muscle of the same muscle group. (Therefore the longus muscle would span more than the entire length of the brevis muscle within a particular muscle group.) This can be observed in the adductor muscle group in which the adductor brevis inserts onto the middle 1/3 portion of the linea aspera and the adductor longus inserts onto the distal 1/3 portion of the linea aspera. Since the adductor longus has a more distal insertion point onto the femur than the adductor brevis, it must be a longer muscle (hence the name adductor longus).




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